Bibliography: Hurricane Katrina

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina turned a national spotlight on the politics of race, sex, property, and power in the city of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. While historically a profoundly interracial and international city, images associating New Orleans with poverty and blackness flooded media outlets across the world. These images illuminated the profound complications the city’s history of slavery, segregation, and systematic racial oppression had on the evacuation process, clean up, recovery, and on the return of thousands of New Orleanians. By including a broad selection of resources–from films and policy documents to newspaper articles and scholarly essays–this bibliography seeks to capture the tangled nature of this on-going process, and describe the dynamics of race in post-Katrina New Orleans. When read alongside the accompanying titles across the bibliography, it becomes clear that much changed in New Orleans after the hurricane, but much also remained the same.

BondGraham, Darwin. “The New Orleans that Race Built: Racism, Disaster, and Urban Spatial Relationships..” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture & Society 9, no. 1 (January 2007): 4-18.  

Bonner, Fred Arthur II. “Guest Editorial: God’s Gon’ Trouble the Water: An African American Academic’s Retrospective on Hurricane Katrina.” The Journal of Negro Education 75, no. 4 (Fall 2006): 573-578.

Bullard, Robert D., and Beverly H. Wright. “Black New Orleans: Before and After Hurricane Katrina.” In The Black Metropolis in the Twenty-First Century: Race, Power, and Politics, 173-197. Rowman & Littlefield, 2007.  

Cecil, Katherine. “CecilFilm Productions,” n.d. http://cecilfilm.com/web/html/h0401.html.

Czaja, Erica M. “Katrina’s Southern “Exposure,” the Kanye Race Debate, and the Repercussions of Discussion..” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture & Society 9, no. 1 (January 2007): 53-71.  

Dao, James. “Study Says 80% of New Orleans Blacks May Not Return.” nytimes.com, January 26, 2006. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/27/national/nationalspecial/27orleans.html?pagewanted=print.

Davis, Mike. “Who Is Killing New Orleans?.” The Nation, March 23, 2006. http://www.thenation.com/doc/20060410/davis.

Dyson, Michael Eric. Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster. New York: Basic Civitas, 2006.  

Forman, Tyrone A., and Amanda E. Lewis. “Racial Apathy and Hurricane Katrina: The Social Anatomy of Prejudice in the Post-Civil Rights Era.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 175-202.  

Frey, William, Audrey Singer, and David Park. “Resettling New Orleans: The First Full Picture from the Census.” Brookings Institution, n.d. http://www.brookings.edu/reports/2007/07katrinafreysinger.aspx.

Frymer, Paul, Dara Z. Strolovitch, and Dorian T. Warren. “New Orleans Is Not The Exception: Re-Politicizing the Study of Racial Inequality.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 37-57.  

Goldberg, David Theo. “Deva-stating Disasters: Race in the Shadow(s) of New Orleans.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 83-95.  

Harris-Lacewell, Melissa. “Do You Know What It Means…: Mapping Emotion in the Aftermath of Katrina..” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture & Society 9, no. 1 (January 2007): 28-44.  

Hartman, Chester, and Gregory D. Squires. There is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster: Race, Class, and Hurricane Katrina. 1st ed. Routledge, 2006.  

Herring, Cedric. “Hurricane Katrina And The Racial Gulf: A Du Boisian Analysis of Victims’ Experiences.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 129-144.  

Howell, Susan E., and John B. Vinturella. “Forgotten in New Orleans.” nytimes.com, April 20, 2006. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9407E6DB143FF933A15757C0A9609C8B63.

Huddy, Leonie, and Stanley Feldman. “Worlds Apart: Blacks and Whites React to Hurricane Katrina.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 97-113.  

Kao, Grace. “Where Are The Asian And Hispanic Victims Of Katrina?: A Metaphor for Invisible Minorities in Contemporary Racial Discourse.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 223-231.  

Lee, Spike. When the Levees Broke – A Requiem In Four Acts. DVD. HBO Home Video, 2006.

Lie, John. “The Last Last Wave.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 233-238.  

Lieberman, Robert C. “”The Storm Didn’t Discriminate”: Katrina and the Politics of Color Blindness.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 7-22.  

Marable, Manning, and Kristen Clarke. Seeking Higher Ground: The Hurricane Katrina Crisis, Race, and Public Policy Reader. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.  

Michna, Catherine. “Stories at the Center: Story Circles, Educational Organizing, and the Fate of Neighborhood Public Schools in New Orleans.” American Quarterly 61, no. 3 (2009).  

“New Orleans, Hurricane Katrina.” Acid Test » 2005 » September, September 14, 2005. http://www.molvray.com/acid-test/2005/09/.

Pagan, Nicole. “Denaturalizing Disaster: Teaching Comparatively on New Orleans and Detroit.” Radical Teacher 87 (2010): 28-36.  

Penner, D’Ann R., and Keith C. Ferdinand. Overcoming Katrina: African American Voices from the Crescent City and Beyond. Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.  

Potter, Hillary. Racing the Storm: Racial Implications and Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina. Lexington Books, 2007.  

Reed, Betsy, and Adolph L Reed. Unnatural Disaster: The Nation on Hurricane Katrina. New York, N.Y: Nation Books, 2006.  

“report2.pdf,” n.d. http://www.s4.brown.edu/KATRINA/report2.pdf.

Rose, Chris. 1 Dead in Attic: After Katrina. Simon & Schuster, 2007.  

Rowell, Charles H., and Leah Chase. “Leah Chase.” Callaloo 29, no. 4 (2006): 1227-1229.  

Rowell, Charles H., and Keith Weldon Medley. “Keith Weldon Medley.” Callaloo 29, no. 4 (2006): 1038-1048.  

Salaam, Kalamu ya. “from “I don’t want to live anywhere where they are killing me”.” Callaloo 29, no. 4 (2006): 1347.  

Shah, Hemant. “Legitimizing Neglect: Race and Rationality in Conservative News Commentary About Hurricane Katrina.” Howard Journal of Communications 20, no. 1 (2009): 1.  

Spatial Structures in Social Science. “Katrina and the Built Environment: Spatial and Social Impacts,” n.d. http://www.s4.brown.edu/KATRINA/.

Sweeney, Kathryn A. “The Blame Game: Racialized Responses to Hurricane Katrina.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 161-174.  

Thomas, Lynnell L. “’The City I Used to…Visit’: Tourist New Orleans and the Racialized Response to Hurricane Katrina.” In Seeking Higher Ground: The Hurricane Katrina Crisis, Race, and Public Policy Reader, edited by Manning Marable and Kristen Clarke, 255-270. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.  

———. ““Roots Run Deep Here”: The Construction of Black New Orleans in Post-Katrina Tourism Narratives.” American Quarterly 61, no. 3 (2009): 749-768.  

———. “Kissing Ass and other Performative Acts of Resistance Austin, Fanon and New Orleans tourism.” Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts 12, no. 3 (2007): 137.  

Troutt, David Dante, ed. After the Storm: Black Intellectuals Explore the Meaning of Hurricane Katrina. New York: New Press, 2006.  

Young, Alford A. “Unearthing Ignorance: Hurricane Katrina and the Re-Envisioning of the Urban Black Poor.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 3, no. 01 (2006): 203-213.  

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